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7.16.2013

Updates

Since my last post, there's been a change in my goals. A happy change that I'm proud to have made. The catalyst for this change came when, upon telling about the Stinson Beach 37K I had signed up for, people consistently asked why not the full marathon? Well, I don't know. Maybe it's because PCTR didn't offer a marathon at that time/location. Maybe I felt that I had no right running in a marathon if I'd never run a half, or whatever. Whatever it was that kept my sights on a distance a mere 4 miles short of a marathon, I didn't understand it either. As if the running gods understood and wondered the same thing, they also made sure to make the lodging in Stinson Beach (or any other reasonably close city) ridiculously expensive. I'm talking nothing less than $150 a night. Driving 9 hours and paying that much for a place to stay just didn't seem worth it for an "almost marathon" race.  You may think this is lousy mentality, but I'm a pusher. If there's a little room to push the limit, I do it. (Beware: this can backfire, especially in race training. I'm learning to manage.)

 Anyhow, all that said, I backed out of the Stinson Beach 37K (was refunded the total cost--the people at PCTR are really cool) and signed up for the Moab Trail Marathon instead.  This race offers some spectacular vistas and decent elevation gain that won't make me weep for my mother mid run. Check out this article from Runners' World to see what it's all about.  Best thing about it?  It's in the dry desert in November (see my countdown ticker).  Frankly, not a lot beats the desert in the fall.  The air is pleasant with a bit of a nip, and the sun shines at an angle creating beautiful shadows that make the land forms seem almost surreal.  Also, I have the pleasure of training for and running this race with my other half.  We make a great team and accomplishing such a feat together is priceless.  We're still on track with our training and are now in week 10 of the training plan. 


5.31.2013

Energy Minus the Fizz

Product Image
So, I don't know what the buzz is about energy drinks.  Whether it's good or bad, healthy or unhealthy, blah blah blah.  All I know is that I occasionally like a good energy drink before a run just like the next person.  However, what I don't like is the awful feeling you get in your gut midway through your run (gas and bloating---I feel like putting it in parenthesis makes it less offensive) that really puts a damper on your enjoyment.  Enter Rockstar Recovery Energy + Hydration.  It's loaded with good vitamins and minerals, only 20 calories per can, yada, yada, yada, and is sweetened with Splenda--the least deadly of the artificial sweeteners (I tease).  But the reason I love this drink so much is because it comes in the elusive "grape" flavor and has little to no carbonation, so no balloon belly when you run.
 Try it out next time you need a boost.  Just remember, nothing kicks peristalsis into high gear like an energy drink so be sure to have access to a restroom before taking off down the trail.  

Happy running,
Tayler

5.30.2013

New Shoes, New Tech, New Goals,


My training is going well!  Plain and simple, I feel like I am accomplishing my little short term goals (weekly mileage and strength exercises) as developing and working up to new long term goals.  Things are good and getting better.  And best of all?  My man is training alongside of me (sometimes, well ahead--read this article about running with the mister).  I want to talk a bit about my goals and training plan, but first, some new goodies I've gotten recently:

After a few LONG visits to my LRS (local running store), Red Rock Running Company, running in and sampling several different pairs of shoes, I finally found a pair that just felt right.  It's the New Balance RC 1600 racing flat.  I'm no racer, but this shoe felt natural on my foot.  Extremely light with an 8 mm drop, it's close to minimal with a bit of spring for extra speed.


...and they're cute to boot.  So far so good with these little beauties.  I'll keep you posted on how they continue to work.  On to the next:  the Garmin Forerunner 10.  I usually track my miles and times with the Endomondo app. on my phone, but the GPS signal is nothing short of a nightmare at times.  I try not to be a slave to any tracking device, but let's face it--knowing your pace is not only useful, it's motivating.  I also liked having the capability to upload my runs to social networking sites for extra motivation and accountability.  The frustration of the inconsistent GPS signal was just too much and I had had my eye on the Forerunner (with its cute colorful wrist band) for some time.  For the price ($125), it does quite a bit.  In addition to tracking mileage and pace, it tracks calories, has interval training options, pacing, speed v. mile/min., and the capability to have your runs uploaded to Garmin Connect for further analysis, sharing, and personalized training plans.  Pretty nice!


For a review of both the New Balance RC 1600's and the Garmin Forerunner 10, follow the links.

Now onto my training and some goals I've been setting....
Because I am starting my training quite a bit in advance, I feel that not only will I be prepared for the Stinson Beach 37K, but I will have a strong foundation on which I can continue to build.  In addition to the running, I am also working through pretty intense strength (total body) training three days per week, and focusing on clean eating*.  All of this has helped me feel and become stronger, and my running has improved.  Here is a sample of the training calendar:
Week
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
1

3 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
3 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 5 miles
Rest
2
3 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
3 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 6 miles
Rest
3
3 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
3 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run:  7 miles
Rest
4
3 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
3 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 8 miles
Rest
5
3 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
3 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 9 miles
Rest
6
3 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
3 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 10 miles
Rest
7
4 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 10 miles
Rest
8
4 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 10 miles
Rest
9
4 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
6 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 10 miles
Rest
10
4 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
6 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 11 miles
Rest
11
4 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
6 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 12 miles
Rest
12
4 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
7 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 12 miles
Rest
13
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
7 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 14 miles
Rest
14
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
8 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 15 miles
Rest
15
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
8 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 16 miles
Rest
16
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
4 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
8 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 16 miles
Rest
17
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
8 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 17 miles
Rest
18
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
9 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 17 miles
Rest
19
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
8 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 17 miles
Rest
20
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
8 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 18 miles
Rest
21
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
7 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 20 miles
Rest
22
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
7 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 21 miles
Rest
23
5 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
3 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
7 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 22 miles
Rest
24
3 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body
Walk 2 miles
Strength:  Upper Body
5 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Long Run: 23 miles
Rest
25
3 miles (morning)
Strength:  Upper Body

Strength:  Upper Body
3 miles (intervals or trail)
Strength: Lower Body
Stinson Beach!
Rest





*I am not dieting.  I suck at "dieting".  What does that even mean, anyway?  However, I am very good about eating healthy, clean meals, and enjoy it.  Not to mention, all natural ice cream is clean eating, so this is a win win.

As for official goals I have set, in addition to running my longest race, I am planning on saving $1 for every mile I run each week.  I read an article recently about finding ways to "celebrate" your weekly success.  Even though this seems pretty measly for weekly payoff, it will add up to just slightly more than $600 by the time Stinson Beach arrives.  That's worth saving for.